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    Lamp tester - Velleman
    Ordered before 10 p.m., delivered tomorrow
    € 9,59

    Reserve Christmas lights

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    Does your classic Christmas lights no longer work and do you think throwing them away is a waste? Make sure you stock up on the right spare outdoor or indoor Christmas lights before the holidays arrive. With us you will find the right spare Christmas lights to give your lights new life. In many cases, classic indoor Christmas lights consist of a strand of light bulbs. These are connected in series, allowing them to be connected to the mains without the intervention of a transformer. For a series connection, it is important that the bulbs are exactly equal to each other. Only then will they all give off the same amount of light. If you want to replace a defective bulb, it is important that you replace it with one of the same voltage and power. Only then will they all, including the new one, burn at a normal level again. If you do not do this, it is possible that the new spare Christmas light burns too brightly and burns out quickly or that the new one burns only very faintly and the others burn slightly brighter. The latter can significantly shorten the life of all light sources.

    The symptoms of a broken bulb

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    It may be that one bulb in the strand stops burning while the rest continue to burn as normal. This is a bit like magic, because if one in a series circuit stops working, basically no current can flow through the other bulbs either. The secret to this is in the bulb itself. The connecting wires are coated with a resistive paste that has a low resistance at low temperature and a high resistance at high temperature. If a bulb is lit, the resistance increases rapidly and most of the current passes through the filament. If the filament is broken, then the resistance remains low and enough current can still flow through the bulb to keep the other light sources in the strand burning. Does the entire strand not work when you plug it in? Then one bulb is broken and the others do not have this convenient function. There are some ways to detect defective ones so you can replace them with spare Christmas lights and the whole strand will light up again. Depending on the kind, it's easy or a little trickier to detect broken bulbs.

    Finding the defect

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    If your light string doesn't work or only works in part, there are a few methods to detect broken bulbs. For large Christmas lights, you can visually inspect each bulb. It is often easy to see through the glass whether the filament is still intact. A black spot or discoloration on the glass is also an indication that it is broken. If this does not work, or if it is not possible to visually inspect the filaments, there are several other methods to detect the broken one. The quickest and most direct method is to use an inexpensive multimeter. You can order these along with your spare Christmas lights. A multimeter has a resistance range that allows you to test a light source. If the bulb conducts, then the filament is still intact. Does it not conduct, then the filament is broken. Test all lights and replace the broken ones with new spare Christmas lights. If you don't have a multimeter, replace the first bulb with a spare bulb and then the second bulb with the first bulb. Go through the strand like this until your strand is lit again.

    Ordering proper spare Christmas lights

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    For your strand to work properly, it is important that you order the right spare Christmas lights. The first thing you pay attention to is the fitting. This can be a plug-in fitting or a screw fitting. With a plug-in fitting, pay close attention to the shape. It should match the shape of the one you are replacing. Light bulbs with a screw base have an E number with a number, for example E10. The number indicates the diameter of the screw thread in millimeters. If you have bulbs with a screw base, measure the diameter of the screw thread. With Christmas lights, the bulbs are almost always connected in series. Therefore, it is crucial that all bulbs have the same voltage and the total equals the mains voltage. Count the number of bulbs in a strand to find out the voltage for each one. Many older strands are still from the 220-volt era, so for an old strand you should divide 220 volts by the number of bulbs. For new strands, you must divide 230 volts by the number of lights. The spare Christmas lights should also be of the same wattage. Fortunately, most spare Christmas lights are of the same wattage, limiting the choice (and chance for error).